Monthly Archives: January 2016

How Do People Get My Information?

By Barbara Parrott McGinity, LMSW

This is one of the most frequent questions I get from people, and my response to is always “we give it to them.” Here are some examples of the many different ways we freely provide information to scam artists.

1) Endless robo calls asking you to press 1 for more information or press 2 to get off their list. The typical reaction is to press 2 to get off the list, but in reality you are confirming that this is a good phone number with someone who answers the phone and follows instructions. Your number is added to a list then sold to the actual scammer who makes a live call to someone they perceive as a potential victim.

2) Legitimate looking spam offering the ability to unsubscribe. When you click that option and put in your email address you are actually putting yourself on a list to get alot of unsolicited offers that never stop. The other trick is receiving emails that purport to be from UPS or Fed Ex, referencing a failed delivery, and you have to click “here” for more information. The bottom line is never click on any link in an email until you have verified the validity of the source.

3) The Internet should come with a the daily warning “Use with Caution.” We surf and search for information but schemers are also searching for us. Far too often, when people are looking for specific information on issues related to insurance quotes or home equity loans and mortgages, they are asked to complete information in a pop up window to be allowed access to the information. Never put in a phone number or other personal information in a pop up window or on a website until you understand how this information will be used.

3) Using Craigslist to trick people into providing contact information. You have an item for sale and receive an email from an interested party asking if you will send your private email address for communication purposes. If you are familiar with Craigslist there is no reason not to use their encrypted service. So why are they asking for your email? They want it to put on a list to sell to spammers and scammers.

4) Then there is the old fashion way, reaching folks via mail. To find individuals vulnerable to sweepstakes scams letters are sent out promising riches for just a return of $10. The group that sends in $10 gets a letter asking for $20. Then the individuals who sent $20 are compiled into a list sold to telemarketers who then call the victims on the phone, gain their confidence, and start asking for money to get their millions.

It is important to stop and think before responding to any situation that requires you to provide any personal information. It will come back in some way you are likely to regret.